DrySpec H35: What Makes The Toughest Adventure Luggage?

DrySpec developed the H35 system with a single-minded intention: Build the toughest, most durable hard luggage for serious adventure riders. And while everyone loves sheet-aluminum panniers and top cases, fact is that a well-developed, thick-skinned co-polymer plastic case can sustain a tremendous amount of abuse and come back for more. It’s resistant to crushing and deformation that would make it impossible to keep closed after a trailside mishap.

DrySpec H35 Features

For the DrySpec H35, this crushproof construction is based on 5mm-thick walls and strategic reinforcements on the corners and backs of the cases themselves. A burly near-full-width hinge and double-action latches with individual locks help create a strong, water tight and rugged case. Waterproof? Yes, actually submersible to IP67 standards.

But the case is just the beginning of a successful luggage system. The DrySpec H35 uses an elegantly simple A-Lock mounting system to mate the bags to SW-MOTECH EVO or PRO side rack system or the GIVI PL-series side racks–those are the ones without the curve. The H35 can be used as a top case, compatible with the SW-MOTECH STEEL TOPRACK, ADVENTURE-RACK, and GIVI’s SR-series top plates. The A-Lock system itself is made from powder-coated steel and features stainless mount bushings for corrosion protection and strength. One huge advantage of the A-Lock system mated to the SW-MOTECH EVO and PRO series of racks is fitment; these racks already fit a huge range of motorcycles on the market.

Back to the A-Lock. Four buttons on the back of each bag ride down the a-shaped adapter plate while an oversized top latch keeps the assembly in place even over really rough roads. That latch also locks the bags to the bike. For added convenience, all of the H35’s locks can be left unlocked so the keys can stay in your pocket or in the ignition while on a trip. It is recommended, however, that you lock the retaining latch before riding in case you encounter “unexpected turbulence.”

The H35s are side-loading cases. And while many riders prefer top-loaders, DrySpec has used a few tricks to make the H35s the best of both worlds. The key ingredient is the Top Load Liner. this liner is fixed to the lid and swings out when you open the case. You can load your gear into the liner almost as you would a top-loader. It takes up little space and can help organize the load. Even better, if you have a need to carry something that won’t fit into the liner, it removes easily, giving you access to the full 35 liters per case.

Not all your gear has to go inside the case, which is why DrySpec also developed a set of rigid MOLLE panels, one for the front back faces of the luggage and another for the inner lid. The MOLLE system is highly adaptable, giving you a place to put a fuel bottle or gear pouches where they’re easily reached. To learn more about the options for your motorcycle, check out our DrySpec H35 A-Lock Luggage Guide!

8
Leave a Reply

avatar
6 Comment threads
2 Thread replies
3 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
7 Comment authors
MikeGaryMarc CookDaveBrian Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Dan
Guest
Dan

Hey Marc, when did you jettison motorcycle.com? I thought you were great there. Best of luck in your new gig, I’m a big fan ( and customer) of TT.

Scott
Guest
Scott

Any chance there will be a smaller version coming out? say 27-30ish liters?

Brian
Guest
Brian

I have been using the H36 dry specs for 4 years and think they are better than metal or soft bags. I use the soft dry bags on the back but like the robustness and protection of the plastic units. No issues on riding the Dalton on my KLR

Dave
Guest
Dave

Not to be critical, but, 7 HUNDRED DOLLARS!?!?!? You can’t be serious. I’m sure they’re top quality, but that price point is rediculous. It’s almost as bad as Lone Rider’s thousand dollar soft bags.

Gary
Guest

Those pelican hard plastic cases and your brand are awesome. Good capacity. And able to take abuse. Dropped my bike a couple times with nothing I’ll affect

Mike
Guest
Mike

Will a dual sport helmet fit inside?